Renewables

What Is Renewable Energy?

Renewable energy, often referred to as clean energy, comes from natural sources or processes that are constantly replenished. For example, sunlight or wind keep shining and blowing, even if their availability depends on time and weather.

While renewable energy is often thought of as a new technology, harnessing nature’s power has long been used for heating, transportation, lighting, and more. Wind has powered boats to sail the seas and windmills to grind grain. The sun has provided warmth during the day and helped kindle fires to last into the evening.

Click to read more at NRDC's website...

What Is Renewable Energy?

Renewable energy, often referred to as clean energy, comes from natural sources or processes that are constantly replenished. For example, sunlight or wind keep shining and blowing, even if their availability depends on time and weather.

While renewable energy is often thought of as a new technology, harnessing nature’s power has long been used for heating, transportation, lighting, and more. Wind has powered boats to sail the seas and windmills to grind grain. The sun has provided warmth during the day and helped kindle fires to last into the evening.

(https://www.nrdc.org/stories/renewable-energy-clean-facts#sec-whatis)

In 2018, wind energy generated within California totaled 14,244 gigawatt-hours (GWh) or 7.3 percent of the in-state total power generation. Wind energy power plants generating in California during at least part of the year had a total capacity of 6,004 megawatts.

Note: Listings that show “CAISO In-State Wind Generation” indicate an estimate has been used in place of WPRS (Wind Performance Reporting System) data. WPRS came into effect for the 2014 calendar year. Starting in 2015, CAISO generation data may be published as a preliminary estimate until validated WPRS data becomes available. The CAISO estimates do not always carry the source county data so the default is “ALL” to refer to counties in California.

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 Do solar panels produce toxic waste?

Solar panels are manufactured using hazardous materials, such as sulfuric acid and phosphine gas, which make them difficult to recycle. ... According to an analysis by Environmental Progress, solar panels create about 300 times more toxic waste per unit of electricity generated than nuclear power plants.Aug 15, 2017

(https://www.instituteforenergyresearch.org/uncategorized/will-solar-power-fault-next-environmental-crisis/)

Toxic Chemicals in Solar Panels

  • Cadmium Telluride. Cadmium telluride (CT) is a highly toxic chemical that is part of solar panels. ...
  • Copper Indium Selenide. ...
  • Cadmium Indium Gallium (Di)selenide. ...
  • Silicon Tetrachloride.

(https://sciencing.com/toxic-chemicals-solar-panels-18393.html)

 

photo of Hyatt Power Plant at Oroville DamEdward Hyatt Power Plant at Oroville Dam
Photo by California Department of Water Resources

In 2018, hydro-produced electricity used by California totaled nearly 26,344 gigawatt-hours (GWh),or 13.51 percent of the state's total system power. A total of 270 hydroelectric facilities with an installed capacity of 14,009 megawatts (MW). The amount of hydroelectricity produced varies each year and is largely dependent on snowmelt runoff and rainfall. The annual average hydroelectric generation from 1983 through 2018 is 271.8 GWh.

Hydro facilities in California fall into one of two categories. Facilities smaller than 30 MW capacity are generally considered an eligible renewable energy resource and are referred to as small hydro. These small hydro facilities must be certified for the net MWh to count according to renewable energy portfolio standards. There are a few cases where some hydro facilities larger than 30 MW may also be eligible under specific eligibility criteria. All other hydro facilities are referred to as large hydro.

One of those hydro facilities is the Edward Hyatt Power Plant on Oroville Dam, pictured on the right. According to the Calif. Dept. of Water Resources, the "Hyatt Power Plant was constructed in the bedrock below Lake Oroville. A cavern the size of two football fields was dug out to house the facility." The Hyatt Power Plant is a large hydro facility and is part of California's State Water Project, which is the largest state-built water and power development and conveyance system in the United States. Hyatt is the fourth largest energy producer of all the hydroelectric facilities in California.

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